Thursday, November 20, 2008

Saucy economy...

Hull's highest profile Tory blogger, Andrew Allison, is using an interesting measure to gauge the downturn in the economy: the price of a bottle of Lea and Perrrins Worcestershire Sauce. Three months ago, Andrew picked up a bottle of L&P for £1.79. Now, he's having to pay 30p more. Quite some hike. But it doesn't appear to be putting AA off parting with his cash. It is not a measure that I could use with any confidence - in my 40-plus years I have only ever owned one bottle of L&P. I bought it in around 1987 and it was left on a shelf for a decade, gathering dust and never used, until I decided to throw it out. I can't recall how much I paid but I imagine it was significantly less than £2.09. I have since often wondered who actually buys and then subsequently uses L&P - having checked out numerous friends kitchen cupboards over the years I have happened upon many dusty and seemingly unopened bottles stashed away, suggesting that this is the kind of product that many people feel the need to buy but then never find any use for this anchovy-laden brown gunk because they realise that nobody drinks Bloody Mary's anymore and there are nicer things with which to blend, baste and marinate. Anyway, the answer is Andrew Allison and Andy, as I often dream about calling him, could, quite possibly, be the saviour of the world economy if he ups his L&P consumption. What price that?

1 comment:

Music Man said...

"Hull's highest profile Tory blogger" is an achievement that cannot be too difficult to reach. I would urge Andrew to look a bit more closely into the story behind his L&P, if he did he would realise there is serious over fishing of the anchovy which is having a severe effect on penguin populations in the South Atlantic. Not all price rises are due to nasty bankers, some are due to the depletion of scarce food resources caused by our actions. To put it on a level that the top Tory blogger might understand, he only has to watch the film 'Happy Feet' and see the trawlers stealing the anchovies from the penguins to grasp the effects.